Why most training courses fail

It’s become common for those with training budgets to be asked to justify spend in terms of Return on Investment (RoI). This is on the face of it quite reasonable as all organisations need to be sure that money is being spent wisely. And there are vast sums involved when taking training at a national level – UK government puts the figure at £45Bn or or average £1,700 for every single employee (the research with detailed figures is here). And yet academic research shows time and time again that it is really hard – if not practically impossible – to show exactly what return organisations get from that money. So I want to suggest why it is so hard to get an answer and then suggest what makes training work.

Cost of training

Imagine you have been just promoted and you are going to manage people for the first time. You have been managed all your working life so you have observed how it is done (and how it should not be done!) and this is your start point. But it is sensible for you to be given some training because your job has changed. In fact, employers are obliged to make sure staff have appropriate training for the tasks they are being asked to undertake. So you go on a course with other newly promoted managers. Typically this could be one or two days. You will be presented with ideas, given exercises and perhaps discuss issues with your peers. You might also reflect on your own management style and all in all be given some interesting ideas. This might seem to help you in your job as you have taken some time to think about your new role as manager.

So how do you measure how much monetary value the organisation is going to get from this course? Over time, perhaps you will manage your people better so that fewer of them become disenchanted and leave. There is a cost that can be placed on recruiting a new team member so there is a possibility there. But how can we be sure that someone staying is as a result of the training course? Also, how can we be sure that perhaps it was best that a particular person leaves as perhaps their replacement is more productive?

 

Valuable training

Returning to the example training course. At the end of the course, you return to work and find two days worth of work piled up and you have to spend your time catching up. There is no time to think further about applying the learning from the course and by the time a lull comes in the work, you have forgotten what you learned. And you may never see the people you were training with again.

This is a very common pattern and it becomes easy to see how learning is lost together with the RoI from the course. It is understandable that staff are released from productive work very reluctantly. But there are ways in which learning can translate from the training room to the workplace.

First, the training must involve the people around the individuals being trained. By this I mean the line manager should discuss what the training is for, what might be gained and how to embed the learning afterwards. The team should be involved through sharing the key points and reflecting on how the manager might be working differently from now on.

Second, the training must involve more than one visit to the training room. The time in between sessions is vital to allow for ideas to sink in, for further reflection to happen and for ideas to form.

Third, include some activity in between sessions. Every one is busy so clearly it is difficult to find time. But the learning will only become habit if there is a chance to try something new in a supported way. Otherwise there is a tendency to revert back to normal behaviour and changes are first put off, and then never actually happen.

Fourth, create a network. When a small group spends intensive training days together, it is wasteful not to use the network for support after the course ends. This can be by as simple a device as a WhatsApp group or email. Sophisticated training might have a web resource to use such as Moodle. but it is easy to set this up – but will only happen with encouragement of the organisers.

Takeaways:

  1. Involve managers of the trainees before and after the course.
  2. Even if your budget is only for 2 days, separate these.
  3. Provide a small task between sessions – a question to answer or technique to try.
  4. Ask attendees to share examples of when ideas from the training made a difference.

 

In these ways, even if you can precisely measure the financial benefit to the organisation, attendees will be consciously aware of the changes they make to their work. And the benefits will become clear to all involved and a culture of learning begins…

 

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