The trouble with young people today…

OK. I think I know what you expect me to say. Perhaps something about snowflakes. Or maybe wondering why some people talk about an epidemic of mental health issues in the young.

But I’m not.

I was prompted to write this blog after reading advice to senior managers to be mentored by someone under 30. Yes. Not to be a mentor FOR a young person but be mentored BY them. One of the very many delights I find working in a university is that I tend to be surrounded by people far younger than me. This is, for example why I joined Facebook in the early days because I discovered the students had set up a “Fan Page” about me but I could only read what they were saying about me by joining. It means that I know that none of them is remotely interested in Twitter, that there is no point in buying CDs and that watching live TV is only for sports. I am also reminded week by week that these are only superficial differences between the generations. There are some environmental context differences over the years to do with what sort of jobs are available, whether buying a house is a realistic prospect or how wealthy we might feel. But there remains a fundamental truth:

there is no such thing as a generation.

Yes. The industry that springs up periodically claiming a new label for a group of people who only have chronological age in common. This is complete nonsense. There are way more differences between people than between generations. Some insist that the world is changing faster than at any time in our history. Others say there are more pressures on the youth than ever before. And commonly people talk about the snowflake generation. But I am here to tell you there is no evidence whatever that any of this is true. My favourite de-bunking of these myths comes from a surprising source – former head of US Special Forces William H McRaven who said recently “Anyone who calls millennials ‘soft’ has clearly never seen them in a firefight” (full article from Task and Purpose is here) . And that too is my assessment despite mercifully never seen millennials in combat. In the students I meet, I see decency, ambition, drive, compassion, ethics, fun, rigour, intellect, curiosity, commitment. I guess there are some who aren’t like that. But my “generation” had that too. And we had dreadful fashion to contend with and mass unemployment … oops. I just fell into the trap myself for a moment.

I’m sorry to keep a military theme, but there is another great example of this being used by the British Army at the moment in its latest recruitment campaign. In recent years there have been challenges to recruit into the forces which are due to a number of factors about its role in the world, pay, conditions and many veterans leaving sooner than before. The latest advertising campaign has played on this perception of the youth and used these slogans:

There was a predictable backlash against this campaign from populist press and from some retired officers. But the recruitment figures were transformed as the image of the forces was presented in this new way. But surely this is an argument for the existence of generation differences? I would say no. The message was that the press talk about millennials as being somehow lesser than previous generations whereas this campaign quite rightly highlights that you people today are just as capable of serving and having a great experience in the forces as previous ones.

I would recommend thinking about that mentoring idea though. If you are in your forties or fifties and don’t spend much time with the under 30s, I suggest you find ways of doing so. It may remind you of things about yourself you might have forgotten.

Finally, if you haven’t already seen it, Admiral McRaven’s Commencement speech at the University of Texas is one of the best of the genre. Well worth 19 minutes of your time and is online here.

2 thoughts on “The trouble with young people today…

  1. Hi, Thanks for the link to the Admiral’s speech. I’m afraid I may not have reached the part you wanted to as I only made it through 3 minutes until I could take it no more. He presents changes in Afghanistan as the lives saved – the US lives saved – by a patrol leader’s decision to go left or right and manages to not talk at all about the impact on the population they were supposedly there to influence. Sorry – not inspirational to me at all.
    Best wishes, fiona

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    1. Obviously this part didn’t work for you! I hope you are in agreement with the sentiment of the piece about how this current crop of service men and women are every bit as fantastic as their predecessors. Perhaps I could try to find a better illustration.

      Like

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